The organs of Paris
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME D-R

Eglise Protestante Unie

du Saint-Esprit

5, rue Roquépine, 75008 Paris

1865 - Merklin-Schütze

1899/09 - Mutin-Cavaillé-Coll

II/14 (12) - mechanical traction - stoplist

The organ of Temple Saint-Esprit was built by Merklin- Schütze in 1865. It had 10 stops on two keyboards including a Swell starting at tenor C and a short pulldown pedalboard, coupled to the GO. Originally, the tribune had the same width as the buffet with the console detached at the edge of the balustrade. In 1899, the tribune was extended by the addition of oblique wings to provide more space for singers, while the instrument was rebuilt by Charles Mutin. It now had 14 stops, including two pedal stops borrowed from the GO. The Pedal counted 32 notes, which was very rare at that time. The manual keyboards had 56 notes each. In 1909, Mutin created additional space on the tribune by repositioning the console to its current place under the organ and placing the large bellows behind the instrument. A general overhaul was carried out around 1970 by Danion/Gonzalez, without any modifications to the instrument. Since its definitive completion in 1909 the Merklin-Mutin organ has had only one overhaul, a half-century ago, compromised in the ensuing decades by the construction of a new ceiling and major water damage in a heavy storm. The city of Paris has designated it among a handful of historical instruments particularly deserving of a restoration today, and the parish is in search of arts patrons willing to contribute to this project. Although the instrument is not fully reliable in its present worn-down condition, it is regularly maintained. The video’s are offered in the hope of making its outstanding tonal qualities better known. (Kurt Lueders)
The construction of the church, from 1863 to 1865, is part of the second stage of transformation of Paris. In this new neighbourhood, the Protestants celebrated their services in a wooden chapel, the chapel of Saint Lazare, which soon proved too cramped. On the decision of Baron Haussmann, in 1862, some land was bought on Rue Roquépine. The construction project was entrusted to Victor Baltard, architect of Les Halles, and the work was carried out under the direction of Theodore Ballu. Victor Baltard was not free to carry out his original project: the Empress Eugénie imposed a neutral façade of a more secular than religious character. The triangular pediment was the only decorative element allowed. The belfry was added at the beginning of the twentieth century. It recalls the one that Baltard had built at Notre Dame de Lorette (architect: Hippolyte Leon). Source: templedusaintesprit.fr/decouvrir/le- temple-du-saint-esprit/

Organiste titulaire

Kurt Lueders

Concerts

The first Sunday of every month at 10 AM Short auditions on Thursday from 12 AM until 2 PM (except during holidays)

Services with organ

Sunday, 10:30 AM Videos Kurt Lueders (pieces) Kurt Lueders (presentation of the organ)
In the plan to maintain the cultural heritage of the City of Paris, this organ is among the instruments requiring a (partial) restoration. Restoration issues Designed in 1867 by Joseph Merklin, the organ of the Temple of the Holy Ghost was transformed in 1899-1900 by Aristide Cavaillé- Coll and probably enlarged on this occasion. Having not benefited from significant restoration since its reconstruction at the very end of the 19th century, this instrument is in working order, but is experiencing a number of problems: the general agreement of the sets of funds is defective in the treble, especially at the keyboard of the GO where the wind chest is the oldest; the organ wind tunnel is noisy and the turbine is very dilapidated. Program: a complete restoration of the wind chest of the GO as well as the cleaning of the piping and a general tuning. Call to Patronage: 128,000 euros, exclusive the costs related to the project management, which will be borne by the City of Paris. Source
Organs of Paris

Eglise Protestante

Unie du Saint-

Esprit

5, rue Roquépine, 75008 Paris

1865 - Merklin-Schütze

1899/09 - Mutin-Cavaillé-Coll

II/14 (12) - mechanical traction - stoplist

ORGANS OF PARIS © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME D-R
The construction of the church, from 1863 to 1865, is part of the second stage of transformation of Paris. In this new neighbourhood, the Protestants celebrated their services in a wooden chapel, the chapel of Saint Lazare, which soon proved too cramped. On the decision of Baron Haussmann, in 1862, some land was bought on Rue Roquépine. The construction project was entrusted to Victor Baltard, architect of Les Halles, and the work was carried out under the direction of Theodore Ballu. Victor Baltard was not free to carry out his original project: the Empress Eugénie imposed a neutral façade of a more secular than religious character. The triangular pediment was the only decorative element allowed. The belfry was added at the beginning of the twentieth century. It recalls the one that Baltard had built at Notre Dame de Lorette (architect: Hippolyte Leon). Source: templedusaintesprit.fr/decouvrir/le-temple-du-saint- esprit/
The organ of Temple Saint-Esprit was built by Merklin- Schütze in 1865. It had 10 stops on two keyboards including a Swell starting at tenor C and a short pulldown pedalboard, coupled to the GO. Originally, the tribune had the same width as the buffet with the console detached at the edge of the balustrade. In 1899, the tribune was extended by the addition of oblique wings to provide more space for singers, while the instrument was rebuilt by Charles Mutin. It now had 14 stops, including two pedal stops borrowed from the GO. The Pedal counted 32 notes, which was very rare at that time. The manual keyboards had 56 notes each. In 1909, Mutin created additional space on the tribune by repositioning the console to its current place under the organ and placing the large bellows behind the instrument. A general overhaul was carried out in 1971, without any modifications to the instrument. Since its definitive completion in 1909 the Merklin-Mutin organ has had only one overhaul, a half-century ago, compromised in the ensuing decades by the construction of a new ceiling and major water damage in a heavy storm. The city of Paris has designated it among a handful of historical instruments particularly deserving of a restoration today, and the parish is in search of arts patrons willing to contribute to this project. Although the instrument is not fully reliable in its present worn-down condition, it is regularly maintained. The video’s are offered in the hope of making its outstanding tonal qualities better known. (Kurt Lueders)

Organiste titulaire

Kurt Lueders

Concerts

The first Sunday of every month at 10 AM Short auditions on Thursday from 12 AM until 2 PM (except during holidays)

Services with organ

Sunday, 10:30 AM Videos Kurt Lueders (pieces) Kurt Lueders (presentation of the organ)