The organs of Paris
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME D-R

Eglise Protestante Unie

Paris-Batignolles

44, boulevard des Batignolles, 75017 Paris 1898 - Merklin

1995 - Muhleisen

2009/2019 - Muhleisen

II/15 (13) - pneumatical traction - stoplist

The present temple was built in 1895-1898 by architect Felix Paumier in a neo-Romanesque style. It replaced a wooden chapel erected in 1834. In 1972, the church was divided horizontally. The first floor thus became the place of worship, while the ground floor has many meeting rooms. The space of worship is illuminated by beautiful coloured glass windows with geometric patterns made by the Léon Avenet workshops.
The organ was built in 1898 by Joseph Merklin (buffet designed by Félix Paumier). It was the last instrument built by Joseph Merklin before his retirement in 1890. He introduced his new pneumatic transmission system, which he patented on 20 April 1898. On November 14, 1898, two days after Henri Dallier's inauguration of the instrument, Joseph Merklin sold his business to his successors Guttschenritter and Decock, who electrified the wind tunnel in 1913. After meticulous maintenance throughout the 20th century, the instrument was scrupulously restored by Muhleisen in 1995. The instrument was inaugurated by André Stricker and Marie-Louis Girod. In 2009, the two wind reservoirs were restored. In 2019, the instrument was overhauled by Muhleisen. This organ can therefore be considered a totally authentic example of an organ built by Merklin. It is unfortunate, however, that the acoustics of the building are so dry, following the division of the temple in two.
Organiste titulaire Noël Hazebroucq et al. Concerts Occasionally

Service with organ

Sunday 10.30a.m. Videos Noël Hazebroucq
Organs of Paris

Eglise Protestante

Unie Paris-

Batignolles

44, boulevard des Batignolles, 75017 Paris 1898 - Merklin

1995 - Muhleisen

2009/2019 - Muhleisen

II/15 (13) - pneumatical traction -

stoplist

ORGANS OF PARIS © 2020 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME D-R
The organ was built in 1898 by Joseph Merklin (buffet designed by Félix Paumier). It was the last instrument built by Joseph Merklin before his retirement in 1890. He introduced his new pneumatic transmission system, which he patented on 20 April 1898. On November 14, 1898, two days after Henri Dallier's inauguration of the instrument, Joseph Merklin sold his business to his successors Guttschenritter and Decock, who electrified the wind tunnel in 1913. After meticulous maintenance throughout the 20th century, the instrument was scrupulously restored by Muhleisen in 1995. The instrument was inaugurated by André Stricker and Marie-Louis Girod. In 2009, the two wind reservoirs were restored. In 2019, the instrument was overhauled by Muhleisen. This organ can therefore be considered a totally authentic example of an organ built by Merklin. It is unfortunate, however, that the acoustics of the building are so dry, following the division of the temple in two.
Organiste titulaire Noël Hazebroucq et al. Concerts Occasionally

Service with organ

Sunday 10.30a.m. Videos Noël Hazebroucq