The organs of Paris
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME D-R

Eglise luthérienne

des Billettes

24, Rue des Archives , 75004 Paris 1983 - Muhleisen

III/29 - mechanical traction - stoplist

Photo GO: Jeroen de Haan

Organiste titulaire

Jacques Amade, Eric Ampeau, Aude Heuretematte

Concerts

Seldom

Service with organ

Sunday 11:00 AM, Thursday 7:00 PM (Vespers) Videos -
Built in 1294 at Rue des Jardins, the Church of the Billettes was originally a chapel intended to honor a miracle that aroused great popular fervor. Later, a convent in Carme settled there. The present church and the façade to the right of the portal were built in 1754-1758 after the project of Jacques Hardouin-Mansart of Sagonne. At the Revolution, the church and convent were disused and sold to private individuals. In 1808, Emperor Napoleon authorized the City of Paris to acquire all the buildings and assign them to the Consistory of the Lutheran Church. It was in 1808 that the Lutheran church moved to its premises. The interior layout of the church dates mainly from the Empire and the reign of Louis-Philippe, except for the altar and lectern of contemporary creation by Philippe Kaeppelin. Currently, the parish is part of the tradition of orthodoxy where organ music and liturgy hold a great place.
In 1842, the church acquired one of the first instruments of the young Aristide Cavaillé-Coll, at the same time as the Lutheran Church of Redemption, which was then its annex. The organ was built for the Universal Exhibition in Paris and was originally intended to serve as a choir organ in St Roch's Church. Several times transformed by Cavaillé-Coll (1863), Mutin (1912) and Gutschenrietter (1945), the instrument consisted of 18 stops on 2 keyboards and pedals, with mechanical transmissions. In 1978, the parish decided to acquire a new organ, commissioned from the Muhleisen House in Strasbourg-Cronenbourg. The old organ was dismantled and reassembled in 1988 in the chapel le de Jésus Enfant of the parish of Ste Clotilde (Paris VIIe). In 1982 and 1983, the new organ was built and mounted on the tribune in the back of the nave. It was the first new organ financed by the city of Paris in the 20th century. It is an instrument in the German Baroque style, with 29 stops on three keyboards and pedals, with mechanical transmissions. The buffet was designed by Rémy Mahler. In 2017, the instrument was overhauled by Muhleisen. In 1987, the church acquired a small choir organ built by Muhleisen. This Positive of 4 stops with pedal ‘en tirasse’ would have been sold to a temple in Marseille in the early 2000s.
Organs of Paris

Eglise luthérienne

des Billettes

24, Rue des Archives , 75004 Paris 1983 - Muhleisen

III/29 - mechanical traction - stoplist

Photo GO: Jeroen de Haan
ORGANS OF PARIS © 2020 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME D-R
In 1842, the church acquired one of the first instruments of the young Aristide Cavaillé-Coll, at the same time as the Lutheran Church of Redemption, which was then its annex. The organ was built for the Universal Exhibition in Paris and was originally intended to serve as a choir organ in St Roch's Church. Several times transformed by Cavaillé-Coll (1863), Mutin (1912) and Gutschenrietter (1945), the instrument consisted of 18 stops on 2 keyboards and pedals, with mechanical transmissions. In 1978, the parish decided to acquire a new organ, commissioned from the Muhleisen House in Strasbourg- Cronenbourg. The old organ was dismantled and reassembled in 1988 in the chapel le de Jésus Enfant of the parish of Ste Clotilde (Paris VIIe). In 1982 and 1983, the new organ was built and mounted on the tribune in the back of the nave. It was the first new organ financed by the city of Paris in the 20th century. It is an instrument in the German Baroque style, with 29 stops on three keyboards and pedals, with mechanical transmissions. The buffet was designed by Rémy Mahler. In 2017, the instrument was overhauled by Muhleisen. In 1987, the church acquired a small choir organ built by Muhleisen. This Positive of 4 stops with pedal ‘en tirasse’ would have been sold to a temple in Marseille in the early 2000s.

Organiste titulaire

Jacques Amade, Eric Ampeau, Aude Heuretematte

Concerts

Seldom

Service with organ

Sunday 11:00 AM, Thursday 7:00 PM (Vespers) Videos -