The organs of Paris
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME D-R

Notre Dame

de Clignancourt

2, place Jules Joffrin, 75018 Paris Orgue de tribune

189x - Merklin

1970 - Beuchet-Debierre

1988 - Barbéris

1990/2010 - Dargassies

II/26 - mechanical traction - stoplist

Orgue de choeur

1898 - Merklin

2000 - Fossaert

II/14 (13) - mechanical traction - stoplist

Photo’s: Jeroen de Haan
The church Until the advent of the Second Empire, Clignancourt was only a small country village north of Paris. For worship, its inhabitants were attached to the church of St. Peter of Montmartre. In 1853, the villagers asked for permission to build a new church, which was approved in 1858 by the Paris City Council. The first stone was laid in May 1859. The construction, in neo- Romanesque style, was entrusted to the architect Paul-Eugène Lequeux (1806-1873). In 1863, an imperial decree created the new parish whose church is dedicated to Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception of Clignancourt. Under the Commune, the church was ransacked. Although it suffers from a slight lack of light, the church has beautiful paintings made by renowned artists (Félix-Joseph Barrias, Michel Dumas, Romain Cazes). Its choir, adorned with murals and figurative stained-glass windows, exudes a certain artistic warmth as it competes for a beautiful axial chapel of the Virgin. The nave is decorated with stained glass windows in the Art Deco style. Masses with organ Saturdays at 6:30 p.m., Sundays at 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. The organ was built by Merklin-Schotze in 1893. It remained intact until 1970. On this date, the Maison Beuchet-Debierre carried out an extension and a complete re-harmonisation of the piping, entrusted to J. Picaud. In 1988, additional work was carried out by Jacques Barbéris and the Parisian Manufacture des Grandes Orgues. In 1990, Dargassies carried out a restoration that corrected the 1970 re-harmonization. The choir organ was built by Merklin in 1898. It preserved its original state and was restored by Yves Fossaert in 2000.
Organs of Paris

Notre Dame

de Clignancourt

2, place Jules Joffrin, 75018 Paris Orgue de tribune

189x - Merklin

1970 - Beuchet-Debierre

1988 - Barbéris

1990/2010 - Dargassies

II/26 - mechanical traction - stoplist

Orgue de choeur

1898 - Merklin

2000 - Fossaert

II/14 (13) - mechanical traction - stoplist

Photo’s: Jeroen de Haan
ORGANS OF PARIS © 2020 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME D-R
The church Until the advent of the Second Empire, Clignancourt was only a small country village north of Paris. For worship, its inhabitants were attached to the church of St. Peter of Montmartre. In 1853, the villagers asked for permission to build a new church, which was approved in 1858 by the Paris City Council. The first stone was laid in May 1859. The construction, in neo-Romanesque style, was entrusted to the architect Paul-Eugène Lequeux (1806-1873). In 1863, an imperial decree created the new parish whose church is dedicated to Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception of Clignancourt. Under the Commune, the church was ransacked. Although it suffers from a slight lack of light, the church has beautiful paintings made by renowned artists (Félix-Joseph Barrias, Michel Dumas, Romain Cazes). Its choir, adorned with murals and figurative stained-glass windows, exudes a certain artistic warmth as it competes for a beautiful axial chapel of the Virgin. The nave is decorated with stained glass windows in the Art Deco style. Masses with organ Saturdays at 6:30 p.m., Sundays at 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. The organ was built by Merklin-Schotze in 1893. It remained intact until 1970. On this date, the Maison Beuchet-Debierre carried out an extension and a complete re-harmonisation of the piping, entrusted to J. Picaud. In 1988, additional work was carried out by Jacques Barbéris and the Parisian Manufacture des Grandes Orgues. In 1990, Dargassies carried out a restoration that corrected the 1970 re-harmonization. The choir organ was built by Merklin in 1898. It preserved its original state and was restored by Yves Fossaert in 2000.